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“Wolf” narrative considered harmful (also biologically unlikely)

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Rands’ “The Wolf” post floated across my Twitters this morning. My immediate reaction was that it was misguided to the point of being potentially harmful. That was 16 long hours ago, but I’m going to see if I can pull the strands of that thought back together.

Michael mentions he’s had the fortune to work with several “wolves” in his career. I’ve worked with a bunch, including teams compromised of nothing but (I guess you’d call that a “pack”). The problem is the post plays into the fantastical narrative of the lone wolf. But here is the secret. No one is a lone wolf. Or at least not completely. “Wolf” is the story that many people want told about them, and that on good days they tell themselves, but in the dark of the soul, we all need help and have doubts. By celebrating the narrative construct rather then reality you perpetuate the dangerous tendency towards isolation that is inherent in this archetype. I’m playing the long game, and in my perspective sooner or later one of two things is going to happen to your isolated “wolf”: either they’re going to run into a hard enough problem that they’re going to need more help then they know how to ask for, or in their bid to maintain their Harvey Keitel-like facade they’ll eventually isolate themselves from new challenges and dead end their usefulness.

So let’s pull back the curtain a bit and understand the archetype:

  • they’re passionate about solving hard problems, and generally they have a few favorite problems they like to gnaw on. That deep personal investment in the solution is what pushed them to develop their skills past the point of their peers in the first place, and also where they find the personal clarity they need to opt out of the clarifying bureaucratic structure of the larger org. With that passion can come narrowness, often expressed as hyper rationality. Pro move: keep supplying hard problems off center of their primary focus.

  • they’ve developed a toolkit. A preferred language, set of scripts, investigative processes, checklist, whatever. And they come back to it over and over again. That disproportionate impact they have, it isn’t magic, its craftsmanship. They’ve mastered their tools to the point where the tools are an extension of their hands. They might see everything as a problem to be solved in Lisp, or via experimentation or machine learning or wireshark. They might have written their own text editor that lacks features what you and I consider non-negotiable, but doesn’t seem to impair their progress. The best of these folks literally generate tools, turning their own idiosyncratic but highly effective approach into tools that the wider org can use. Pro move: create a space and a culture that celebrates investing in tools. Everyone should hone their craft, and a few great tool builders makes everyone if not a 10x programmer, maybe an 8.5x.

  • they’re convinced they’re right. Or at least, they’re convinced often enough that they’re right that they appear convinced all the time. A banal outcome of this is hill climbing. The toxic outcome is stagnation with a hugely talented individual stuck because they don’t know how not to be right. You owe your high impact individuals to surround them with people who challenge them. If they’re really a “wolf” they’re likely to try to wriggle out of this. Pro move: they care about impact, so make the road to impact littered with smart challenging people.

  • the “well defined IC track for non-managers” is probably the project I’ve found most elusive and difficult to execute on. Rands gave me my first key insight into it late one night after much tequila: you have to make sure the role comes with super powers. Management comes with super powers by default, you have a team to force multiply you, and by convention, most corporations share information with managers at a greater rate then ICs. I haven’t found a one-size fits all approach to super powers, but a thing we’ve done is make sure that while the “senior eng org” (super powered engineers) have their own discussion space, they can also ease drop on manager discussions if they so choose.

If you’ve been maneuvered into calling someone “a wolf”, then I hypothesize you’ve let someone who could be transformational to your organization off the hook too easily. Imagine instead of a wolf you had a Intrinsically Motivated Full Stack Product Hacker.

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A Downtime Irony

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So many things can go wrong and often do, but I spend a good third of my time working on infrastructure, monitoring, and analytics so that they don’t.

Here’s what happened: At approximately 4:30pm PT feed fetching ceased. The feed fetchers were still working, which is why my monitors didn’t fire and alert anybody. But I have a second large Mongo database server used exclusively for collecting data about feeds being fetched. There are approximately 75 servers dedicated to feed fetching. These analytics look at average fetch times on a per task server basis. I use these analytics to ensure that my task servers are humming along, as they each use a ton of network, cpu, and memory.

This Mongo analytics servers works in a curious way. If you right-click on a feed and go to Statistics you’ll see the feed fetch history for a feed, stretching back a hundred fetches if the feed has had any issues in fetching. I keep these statistics on an analytics server separate from the regular Mongo server. I do this so that if the mongo analytics server goes down, everything will operate normally.

But the mongo server didn’t go down. It merely gave this error:

OperationError: Could not save document (Can't take a write lock while out of disk space)

Mongo continues serving read queries while not allowing write queries. I didn’t plan for that! And it gets worse. The way MongoDB stores data is that is just keeps growing, even as you delete data. NewsBlur only saves the last few fetches, but deleting old fetches doesn’t give you back any disk space. Every other database server I use has an autovacuum process that takes care of this maintenance work (PostgreSQL, Redis, Elasticsearch, but not MongoDB). It’s unfortunate that this is yet another instance of MongoDB being the cause of downtime, even though the fault lies with me.

The server that is meant to only be used to ensure things are working correctly was itself the culprit for feeds no longer being fetched. This is the ironic part.

NewsBlur’s developer during happier times wearing the 2013 NewsBlur t-shirt in Big Sur

Now comes the painful part. On Wednesday morning (yesterday) I packed my car and headed down to Big Sur to go backpack camping for the first time. I’ve car camped plenty of times, but I felt confident enough to pack my sleeping bag and tent into a big bag and head ten miles into the woods of coastal California.

I headed out, away from cellular service, at 4pm PT, half an hour before the analytics server ran out of disk space. And then returned nearly 24 hours later to a bevy of alarmed tweets, emails, direct messages, and a voicemail letting me know that things were haywire.

But the real problem is that I set a vacation reply on both my personal and work email accounts to say that I’d be out until September 3rd. Now, I hired a firm to watch the servers while I’m at Burning Man starting this Saturday. But I figured I could get away with leaving the servers for twenty four hours. And I neglected to tweet out that I’d be gone for a day, so theories cropped up that I was injured, dead, or worse, ignoring the service.

Brittany, NewsBlur’s developer’s girlfriend, can handle any situation, including driving a hysterical developer three hours back to San Francisco without breaking a sweat.

If you’re wondering, I think about NewsBlur first thing in the morning and last thing at night when I check Twitter for mentions. It’s my life and I would never just give up on it. I just got cocky after a year and a half of nearly uninterrupted service. NewsBlur requires next to no maintenance, apart from handling support requests and building new features (and occasionally fixing old ones). So I figured what harm could 24 hours of away time be? Boy was I wrong.

If you made it this far then you probably care about NewsBlur’s future. I want to not only assure you that I will be building better monitoring to ensure this never happens again, but to also offer anybody who feels that they are not getting their money’s worth a refund. Even if you are months away from payment, if you aren’t completely satisfied and think NewsBlur’s just about the best thing to happen to RSS since Brent Simmons released NetNewsWire back in 2004, then I want to give you your money back and let you keep your premium account until it expires.

I would like to also mention how much I appreciate the more light-hearted tweets that I read while on the frenetic three hour drive back to San Francisco from Big Sur. I do this for all of your happiness. If I did it for the money I’d probably find a way to juice the data so that I could at least afford to hire an employee. This is a labor of love and your payment goes directly into supporting it.

Big Sur is where a good many new ideas are thought.
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rafeco
10 days ago
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Don't feel bad, databases gonna database.
acdha
11 days ago
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This is such a perfect sysadmin story. Kudos to Samuel for sharing the details.
Washington, DC
samuel
12 days ago
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Ugg, I feel so horrible about the downtime, and so soon after feeling so wonderful.
The Haight in San Francisco
sredfern
12 days ago
I'd rather you have a holiday and I deal with a couple of hours of downtime :)
brucealdridge
12 days ago
you deserve a holiday ... and 75 feed servers?!?!
samuel
12 days ago
That's only the feed fetchers. I also have a few dozen apps servers and a dozen different database servers. NewsBlur's a hungry beast!
larand
12 days ago
Stuff happens. Thank you for all the work you've put into NewsBlur, and I have absolutely no intention of asking for a refund. Hell, I'd renew early if need be.
mp4328
12 days ago
have an amazing Burning Man experience!! - don't worry about us while you're out there.
jqlive
12 days ago
No worries man. Stuff happens. Enjoy Burning Man. Thanks for all the hard work.
rikishiama
12 days ago
no worries here too. great honest post that makes me feel good I'm a year-plus paying user.
wreichard
11 days ago
Ditto to all these comments!
acdha
11 days ago
Enjoy a break. The rest of us can use some practice dealing with not clicking refresh like a rat in a behavioural study…
kpjackson
11 days ago
Let me add my note of appreciation for your honesty and dedication to this great product. Downtime happens and we can all learn lessons from our mistakes. It's when we don't learn that we should really feel horrible. Oh, and I plan to be a happily paying customer for years to come. Also, any plans for a 2014 NB Tee?
StunGod
11 days ago
Having been in similar situations in the past, I totally understand. You're doing good work here, and NewsBlur is the only reader I use. I'll be paying for it as long as you're willing to accept payment.
samuel
11 days ago
I would love to get a 2014 NewsBlur t-shirt out there, but I haven't found a designer yet. Most want $1000+ for a design, and I'm telling them there's only about a hundred of these things that are going to sell. Happy to hear ideas!
getwired
11 days ago
So sorry that it had to happen while you were away. Thanks for the status update - but mostly, thank you for the wonderful service you've built. It's invaluable to me (I feel like I owe you more than I pay.) Thanks!!!
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28 public comments
laza
10 days ago
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Don't feel horrible, this just showed us how valuble Newsblur is for our workflow or procrastination :) , and i'm so jealous that you are going to Burning Man, you should write a blog post about your experience there.
Belgrade, Serbia
emdot
11 days ago
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I absolutely love NewsBlur. Thanks to Samuel for the update -- things like this make me even more happy to use the service. Thanks for your hard work.
San Luis Obispo, CA
satadru
11 days ago
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I'm considering it a hallmark of the intensity of the academic program I'm in that I didn't much notice the Newsblur downtime.
New York, NY
jbouvier
11 days ago
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Any developer knows downtime happens. The only thing you can do is your best to prepare, and when the shit hits the fan, be honest about the cause. This is how all developers & companies should treat these inevitable occurrences.
Chicago, IL
chengjih
11 days ago
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Hah, I am so far behind on my feeds I didn't even notice the issue. 6000+ unread articles before the outage, 6000+ after.
llucax
11 days ago
Same here, I don't have as many unread stuff, but this is just a RSS feed reader, come on! Let this guy have a day off!
loic
11 days ago
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Murphy + mauvais timing + gestion de crise = super post
France
smadin
11 days ago
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Well, here's what happened with Newsblur.
Boston
smilerz
11 days ago
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Murphy strikes again.
Chicago or thereabouts
sirshannon
11 days ago
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Exactly.
Cafeine
11 days ago
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That combo of bad timing and technical glitch is just crazy. -_-;
Paris / France
Berstarke
11 days ago
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Meh. No worries here. Murphy happens to everybody, man.
bronzehedwick
11 days ago
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No intention of asking for a refund. :)
Brooklyn NY
gradualepiphany
11 days ago
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Hopefuly it doesn't put you off going backpacking again. Thanks for being so diligent!
Los Angeles, California, USA
sredfern
11 days ago
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Here here.
Sydney Australia
lkraav
11 days ago
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What needs to happen in order for Sam to be able to hire an employee? How much would the yearly rate go up?
Tallinn, Estonia
renefischer
11 days ago
Thats a question I also want to raise. There definitely need some kind of business continuity for situations like that (or even worse one). I really appreciate the work Samuel is doing here and I love Newsblur, but I also see that its to heavily depends on one person.
jlvanderzwan
11 days ago
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Gotta work on your bus factor, Sam! :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus_factor
renefischer
12 days ago
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I realy like what you are doing Samuel. I hope there is some kind of business continuity just in case something urgent is happening to you and you can't react personaly to help this lovely service. If not, please take that downtime as a signal to think about something to prevent situations like that. Newsblur is IMO too heavily depending just on one (great) person.

I'm going to renew my subscription, which is ending right now to support the further development of this great service.
Pliening
wmorrell
12 days ago
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It is honest self-assessments like these, and the overall openness of NewsBlur, that makes it better than GReader for me. I remember a few downtimes there that were real downtimes, not just "it takes slightly longer to view feeds".
lasombra
12 days ago
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Samuel, it sucks, but it's part of the job. I love NewsBlur and paid for a premium account after 1 hour of using it. I'm on the second run and all I have to say is "Great job man!"
UK
pablooo
12 days ago
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$PWD
DrewCPU
12 days ago
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The whole day, I thought "Poor Sam, he's gotta be going nuts!" I hope you enjoyed your much-deserved offline day.

Meanwhile, I was looking at all of my feeds manually and realized that I didn't need some of them and did some cleanup.
New Jersey
kazriko
9 days ago
Hah. I was doing the same, but mostly moving sites that haven't updated in years to my "Dead Sites" folder. I keep them there just so I can see if something suddenly revives on me.
rewingau
12 days ago
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The main thing I learnt from this downtime was just how much I value Newsblur. Hint - a lot!

And as for the downtime - the demon Murphy laughs at your camping trip...
Canberra, Australian Capital T
alannashaikh
12 days ago
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This is really no big deal. Stuff happens.
rtreborb
12 days ago
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Hard to be upset with you, Samuel. Thanks for all you do!
tedder
12 days ago
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it's all good. you have a great story to tell at a conference now.
Uranus
DavidForest
12 days ago
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Thank you for the explanation. I value it when services I use break explain what occurred. Things like this happen, as anyone in technology based roles would know. I for one still really like using NewsBlur and will continue to do so as a paying customer. Keep up the good work and enjoy Burning Man.
rubin110
12 days ago
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Thanks for rocking the thin blurry line between open source and able to financially support you and your work. In all honesty a random day of down time is a blessing with the number of feeds I've got going. Thanks again for all you've done.
San Francisco, CA, USA
kazriko
12 days ago
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No chances for requesting a refund here. The service is too good, and has been too stable. This is a really unusual bit of downtime. Thanks for being on top of it for so long. I was still able to fetch and read the important feeds by instant-fetching then looking at each feed separately, so no real issue other than being time consuming.
Colorado Plateau
denubis
12 days ago
I completely agree. Downtime happens, and developers deserve vacations. This is a wonderful service.
g_hoges
12 days ago
+1 from me too. I love the service, and tolerate far more downtime from things like banking platforms. Continue to rock, Samuel
lasombra
12 days ago
Right on man. Downtimes happen and Samuel has been rocking on the downtime arena for a very long time. It wasn't the end of the world. It sucks, but happens.
murrayhenson
11 days ago
Seconded. Also, Samuel took the time to quickly comment on what went wrong and to really accept responsibility. You can't buy that but it's worth a hell of a lot.
JamesDiGioia
11 days ago
And the thing about it is it's not strictly "downtime" - you could access the service, and with some minor hacky workarounds, continue to use it. Definitely not asking for a refund.
JimB
9 days ago
I quite agree with you. Everyone is entitled to a break from the grind, and *sometimes* computers do unexpected things. The amazing thing is that you sorted out so quickly once you found out.
cmarshall
9 days ago
Every system has issues occasionally - the important thing is how you handle them. The two keys are communication and getting it fixed. You done good.

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

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Here's the trailer for the third and final movie in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit trilogy:

The Hobbit was initially supposed to be just two films but Jackson decided to split the second film into two. From Wikipedia:

According to Jackson, the third film would contain the Battle of the Five Armies and make extensive use of the appendices that Tolkien wrote to expand the story of Middle-Earth (published in the back of The Return of the King).

The second movie was better than the first so I'm looking forward to this one. But then again, I'm totally in the tank for Jackson's take on Middle Earth (I did the Weta Digital tour when I was in New Zealand) so I would see it even if the first two movies sucked.

Tags: movies   Peter Jackson   The Hobbit   trailers   video
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rafeco
12 days ago
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I thought the first Hobbit movie was the most wretched adaptation of a novel ever filmed.
petrilli
12 days ago
As someone who actually enjoyed the extended cuts of the first, these have been terrible. The first one was so horrendous that I didn't even bother to see the 2nd. He needs an editor, stat.
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nickoneill
21 days ago
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COMING THIS SUMMER: Dwarf Fortress, the Movie
san francisco

Police Impunity in Ferguson

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One more on the police in Ferguson. Matt Yglesias:

The other two men in the photograph, despite presumably being police officers, are not identifiable at this time. Unlike normal police officers, they are not wearing name tags or badges with visible numbers on them. When police arrested the Washington Post’s Wesley Lowery and the Huffington Post’s Ryan Reilly, they weren’t wearing badges or name tags nametags either. Reasonable people can disagree about when, exactly, it’s appropriate for cops to fire tear gas into crowds. But there’s really no room for disagreement about when it’s reasonable for officers of the law to take off their badges and start policing anonymously.

There’s only one reason to do this: to evade accountability for your actions. […]

Policing without a name tag nametag can help you avoid accountability from the press or from citizens, but it can’t possibly help you avoid accountability from the bosses. For that you have to count on an atmosphere of utter impunity. It’s a bet many cops operating in Ferguson are making, and it seems to be a winning bet.

Disgraceful. Every police officer should not only always wear their badge and name tag while on duty, they should be proud to do so. (And in most cases, that’s true.)

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rafeco
14 days ago
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Removing one's badge while on duty should be a firing offense for policemen.
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JayM
14 days ago
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.
Boston Metro Area

Testing Without A Brain

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tagged testing, rant.

Testing Without A Brain

Testing software is perhaps one of the most controversial topics among programmers. Opinions range from “test first and test everything” to “tests slow us down”. As with so many things, the truth lies somewhere in between. After making my own experiences in a lot of different projects, I have to admit to myself that finding the perfect balance is still a hard a lot of times.

Starting out in a new project, time pressure usually is low and we programmers are highly motivated to get our hands dirty with coding rather than eliciting yet another requirement. I found that people tend to write unit tests more readily at this stage. And arguably the code quality seems to be better than when working under tight deadlines. But that’s not necessarily related to the tests, it could very well be attributed to the relative freshness of the people on the project.
As projects get into a more intense phase the ratio between test-code and production-code usually takes a hit. So is this a bad thing?

How much is too much

Kent Beck, the originator of the term Test Driven Development for sure has a ton of experience in writing software and in testing it. It might come as a surprise for many that he draws a pretty tight line between what is actually too much testing1:

I get paid for code that works, not for tests, so my philosophy is to test as little as possible to reach a given level of confidence…

If I don’t typically make a kind of mistake … I don’t test for it.

To me that sounds very reasonable. Blindly striving for a high test coverage just doesn’t cut it. On the contrary: if a programmer is just guided by his coverage report, he will probably write some hard to maintain test code. And hard-to-maintain test code will eventually lead to reduced testing since the damn tests require more and more work to keep them in sync with changes made to the software. Those tests will get kicked out – and that with good reason!

There is another issue I found with some of my unit testing: Overuse of abstractions. While I’d consider abstractions in general a desirable and good thing, they really only make sense when there is the actual need for an abstraction. If you only have one implementation of some functionality in your code, why go through the effort of generalizing? Since by definition there is only one thing to abstract about, your abstraction will probably have to be refined when introducing a second implementation.
But writing unit-tests mandates the use of abstractions since you only want to test some piece of code in isolation of the rest of the system – for which some kind of interface definitions come in handy. So you bite the bullet and create your interfaces, change the code around, build mocks and other scaffolding and hours later start writing your tests…while at the same time you could have cranked out this extra feature or stomped this nasty bug. Sounds like a tough choice to me.

The kind of software

When people show me their incredibly cool new test framework or preach about the absolute imperative of having thoroughly unit-tested code, the examples they come up with usually lend themselves to a unit-test centric approach. But we rarely have to write the next sorting algorithm or code to serialize and de-serialize data.
The day-to-day stuff often involves database access, updating a UI, network code a.s.o. Those things are by far harder to cover by unit-tests and tend to involve some heavy machinery. Time spent with setting up unit-tests might be spent more effectively otherwise.

The kind of testing

I still consider testing my software with due diligence an integral part of the job. For some code this might very well be exhaustive unit testing, in other cases a different strategy might prove the better choice – like moving more into a more global approach where the functionality is tested as part of a bigger use-case. This kind of testing – often called integration-testing – is much harder to automate and thus does not always allow for regression testing, but it can be the right choice and help you to implement and test your code more quickly.
There is another very different flavor of testing I so far omitted: the kind of testing in a dynamically typed language that makes sure that trivial (or not so trivial) changes do not completely mess up your code-base. Those tests – I’d rather call them syntactic checks – are a prerequisite to stay sane. I did a couple of larger ruby programs and it was really painful to come back to the code at some point later: to find out I had a hard time to introduce changes just because I broke the code in unintended ways and my test coverage was not high enough to detect it.

Striking a balance

So what would be good advice for that new guy that started in your C++ department yesterday. Test everything? Strive for high coverage? I’d say yes – but as with every advice this should be taken with a grain of salt. If you end up with double the amount of code and possibly a different design I’d say you clearly overshot. In the end it’s not the unit-tests that are responsible for great software – it’s the talent and the ability of the developer.
On the other hand if the new guy writes your next rails application, the answer is much simpler: test the shit out of the code!


  1. see Kent Beck’s reply on stackoverflow to “How deep are unit tests”

You can contact me via e-mail or send me a tweet @marcontwit

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Sorry about your startup

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So I came across yet another article on Hacker News running a post-mortem on a failed startup. Right off the bat it asserts:

Entrepreneurs often write about what’s going right, but too rarely write about what’s gone wrong.

I’m sure there was a point in tech bubble history when this was true. But that point was a long time ago. Startup guys write about what went wrong all the damn time. I am pretty sure if I started a startup pitched as a platform for other startups to explain why they tanked, I would get VC money for it, especially if I could get a good deal on failr.com.

And I don’t want to pick on the author of this particular article. He’s a solid enough writer, his startup looks genuinely interesting rather than stupid, and hey, he sure went above and beyond in mistake-making. (“And so I learned that we hadn’t been paying payroll taxes for almost three years.” Oopsie!) But these articles are becoming post hoc navel-gazing bemoaning subsets of the same problems, over and over. They’re Chinese-American takeout menus of fail: I’ll have the “hired too many people soon” and “didn’t scale fast enough” from Column A, “poor communication” and “ill-defined cofounder roles” from Column B, and some extra sweet and sour sauce.

And this makes this soul-baring part of the performance, like consciously dressing down and overpaying for loft space. They’re written for potential investors and employees who hang around sites like Hacker News. They’re spin. Bob’s heart-rending tale of how he spent ten months with no income so he could avoid laying off his last three employees as long as possible, eventually living under his office desk and subsisting entirely on chocolate chai and teriyaki jerky, ensures you remember him as a naïve but sincere and selfless CEO who gave his all and shared his mistakes with the world. Without this bracing splash of sincerity aftershave, you might instead remember Bob as a twenty-two year old who burned through $7M of VC money creating an iOS app that sends the word “Meh” to selected friends on your contact list. (“We see an immense upside potential vis a vis the growing Irony as a Service (IaaS) market.”)

Ultimately, most startups in the current tech boom are going to fail for one of three reasons:

  1. The core idea of the company isn’t that good. Maybe it’s Pets.com, or Color. And if you’re pitching your startup as “like X for Y”—like Facebook for geek girls! like Instagram but only for cat pictures!—you have a problem.
  2. The core idea won’t generate more income than outcome before you run out of money. Why, yes, everyone loved StoreYourHugeFilesforFree.com, but it turns out you can’t make it up in volume after all.
  3. Your team is collectively not experienced enough to see mistakes before they kill you.

Your idea wasn’t that good, you didn’t have the capital, or you didn’t have the experience. That’s 99% of why all businesses fail. Yet those reasons are almost never in “Why My Startup Failed” articles except as hidden subtext. The stories Silicon Valley most likes to hear about itself are stories about why outliers aren’t outliers—why anyone can move right out of college into founding the new Facebook or Google. And so when we fail, we tell ourselves stories that don’t disrupt that myth. It’s absolute heresy to suggest that real world experience often outweighs youthful energy and a degree from Stanford, but most of the “mistakes you should never make” aren’t mistakes someone with the appropriate work experience would have made.

If your startup fails and it helps you to write about it, write about it. But don’t write about it because you want to prove to the world and future investors that you’re a cool guy after all. Write about it brutally honestly. Get it out of your system. Then don’t put it online. We love you, but we’ve heard it already. Next time hire an accountant.

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rafeco
37 days ago
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Yep.
acdha
36 days ago
The part I'm still surprised by is how similar this was to the .com bubble – I know the tech industry doesn't think long-term but I'd have expected the memory to last at least a decade.
superiphi
36 days ago
As long as there is so much money around with nowhere else to get invested...
acdha
35 days ago
@superiphi: that's one of the best arguments for breaking VC out of its nerdy white guy focus – there's no way the diminshing returns we've seen on startup ideas represents the sum total of things humanity could build…
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pfctdayelise
36 days ago
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Love this, but I think people should still keep writing about failure, if only to try and counter the shiny continually promised by VCs and other startup wankery.
Melbourne, Australia
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